Stats suggest omicron surge is easing, but not yet over, in Massachusetts

COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations continue to decline in Massachusetts and across the country following the peak of the dramatic omicron outbreak. In Massachusetts, 4,195 new cases of coronavirus were reported Friday by the Department of Public Health. The previous Friday, the state reported 7,181 new cases and it reported 13,935 the previous Friday. “The omicron surge was so powerful that we saw three times as many cases as during the peak of any other surge, cases are now almost as high as they were at the peak about a year ago,” said Dr. Todd Ellerin, chief of infectious diseases at South Shore Health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that as of Wednesday, cases were down 53.1% from their January 15 peak. However, other measures remain high. In Massachusetts, the number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 is roughly half what it was in mid-January, but it’s still three times what it was in October. The CDC reports that community transmission is considered high throughout Massachusetts and 99% of all counties nationwide. We also need to look at transmission and hospitalization rates,” said Dr. Ali Raja, executive vice president of emergency medicine at MGH. The United States also passed a grim milestone with more than 900,000 lives lost to the virus. Ellerin said the majority of deaths he has witnessed have been in younger, unvaccinated people. “It’s really tough when you see patients that you care about and you just want them to basically put on their molecular seat belt which is this vaccine,” he said.

COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations continue to decline in Massachusetts and across the country following the peak of the dramatic omicron outbreak.

In Massachusetts, 4,195 new cases of coronavirus were reported Friday by the Department of Public Health. The previous Friday, the state reported 7,181 new cases and it reported 13,935 the previous Friday.

“The omicron surge was so powerful that we saw three times as many cases as during the peak of any other surge, cases are now almost as high as they were at the peak about a year ago,” said Dr. Todd Ellerin, chief of infectious diseases at South Shore Health.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that as of Wednesday, cases were down 53.1% from their January 15 peak. However, other measures remain high.

In Massachusetts, the number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 is roughly half what it was in mid-January, but it’s still three times what it was in October.

The CDC reports that community transmission is considered high throughout Massachusetts and 99% of all counties nationwide.

“I love that cases across the country are going down right now, but we can’t just look at the number of cases. We also have to look at transmission and hospitalization rates,” Dr Ali Raja said. , Executive Vice-President of Emergency Medicine at the MGH.

The United States also passed a grim milestone with more than 900,000 lives lost to the virus.

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Ellerin said the majority of deaths he has witnessed have been in younger, unvaccinated people.

“It’s really tough when you see patients that you care about and you just want them to basically put on their molecular seat belt which is this vaccine,” he said.

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